[IAU logo]

[URSI logo]

[Karl Jansky at his antenna]
Jansky and his antenna. NRAO/AUI image

[Reber's Wheaton antenna]
Reber's Wheaton antenna. NRAO/AUI image

[Dover Heights]
Dover Heights. Photo supplied by Wayne Orchiston

[4C telescope]
4C telescope. NRAO/AUI image

[Ewen and horn antenna]
Ewen and the horn antenna, Harvard, 1951. Photo supplied by Ewen

[Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Cambridge antenna used in pulsar discovery]
Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Cambridge antenna used in pulsar discovery. Bell Burnell image

[Wilson, Penzias, and Bell Labs horn antenna]
Wilson, Penzias, and Bell Labs horn antenna. Bell Labs image


Shinzo Enome
Shinzo Enome (Photo courtesy of Mrs. Ume Enome)

Shinzo Enome

Contributed by Masato Ishiguro


Prof. Shinzo Enome passed away on March 24th 2011 at the age of 72 years.

Enome-san initiated research on solar radio astronomy in 1966 at the Research Institute of Atmospherics, Nagoya University (Toyokawa). Using the multi-element radio interferometers at Toyokawa, he carried out a statistical study on the relation of solar active regions with radio spectrum and polarization properties. The results were used in forecasting solar activity. He also studied the acceleration process of high energy particles in solar flares and the radio emission mechanism.

In 1988, Enome-san moved to National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) to participate in the project to construct large radioheliograph at Nobeyama. He played a very important role in this project by unifying solar radio astronomy groups at Toyokawa and Nobeyama into a single group. As the director of the Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, he led the construction of the radioheliograph and succeeded in completing the construction in two years.

Enome-san retired from NAOJ in 1999 and was appointed emeritus professor at NAOJ for his contributions in radio astronomy and solar physics.


Modified on Wednesday, 18-Dec-2019 08:21:17 EST by Ellen Bouton, Archivist (Questions or feedback)